BackBack

Marble Shiv Parivar Parivar Murti 10"

ININ
USUS
Rs. 62,000.00 Rs. 56,000.00
SKU: 090020
Calculate Shipping
This Price includes door delivery by FedEx to mainland USA and Canada. Please contact us for a quote to another country.

Idol Details

  • God Name : Shiv Parivar
  • Height : 10 Inches
  • Base Width and Depth : 9 x 3.25 Inches
  • Weight : 5 kgs or 11 pounds
  • Material : White Marble
  • Painting : Lavish Gold
Description
  • This murti is handcrafted by our artisans using age-old techniques of murtikala and is a guaranteed original.
  • Every idol is one-of-a-kind that is painstakingly carved out of a block of white marble, and therefore, has its own unique variations.
  • Our marble statues are finely hand-painted and ornamented with original 24k Gold foil to enhance its features.
  • Our moortis ship worldwide from India with a hassle free door delivery and full insurance against damage in transit.
About Ganesh

Ganesha, also known as Ganapati, is the most revered, loved and distinctive deity among the pantheon of Hindu gods. With his large elephant head, chubby and pot-bellied human body, his role as the supreme-being, powerful enough to remove obstacles and ensure success is of paramount importance. Besides being the remover of all obstacles, he is also the God of Good Fortune who ensures prosperity and success. It is his blessings that are taken before the commencement of any auspicious endeavour.

Invoking Ganesha’s presence can be especially helpful for:

  • To commence any big or small endeavor in which you want to succeed.
  • Creative and artistic projects.
  • Seeking wisdom before making a big decision such as deciding whether to leave a job or change careers.
  • Any situation where an obstacle is preventing you from success.
  • As a witness and guide during a wedding ceremony.
  • Maintaining a harmonious home.

He aptly named “Lord of the People” (Gana means the common people) and is generally depicted with four hands, one of which (his lower left) is holding a few round Indian sweets, of which he is very fond. His lower right hand is usually depicted in the abhaya mudra or blessing pose as a gesture of reassurance and safety, which dispels fear and offers divine protection to his devotees. His vehicle (vahana) is a rat, which he rides, is an symbolic extension of himself and his powers that represents his ability to overcome any obstacle big or small.

Revered for his cleverness and wisdom, legend has it that Ganesha is said to have written down the legendary Indian epic the Mahabharata with his broken tusk.

The 10-day festival, normally during August–September, of Ganesh Chaturthi is dedicated to him.

About Lakshmi

Lakshmi or Laxmi is the resplendent Hindu Goddess of wealth and prosperity who provides us with material fulfillment and abundance. She is also the divine consort of Lord Vishnu, the Creator, and bestows riches and splendour on his behalf for the maintenance and preservation his creation - the Universe.

It is believed that anybody who ardently invokes the blessings of Mahalakshmi will be blessed and rewarded with fortune and success. She is particularly worshipped during the festival of Diwali, which marks the beginning of the Hindu calendar year. Two days before Diwali, a festival called Dhanteras is celebrated to seek special blessings from her as merchants close their books of accounts and seek her blessings while opening new ones on the onset of the Hindu New Year. During this time Hindus also buy gold and silver and often start auspicious ventures.

Lakshmi is depicted in the female form with four hands and is typically seated on a Padma or Lotus. The four hands represent the four ends of human life: dharma (righteousness), kama (genuine desires), artha (wealth), and moksha (liberation from birth and death). The front hands represent the activity in the physical world and the back hands depicted with her carrying the lotus buds indicate the spiritual activities that lead to spiritual perfection.

The golden coins falling on the ground from the front left hand in the Varada mudra (giving gesture) illustrate that She is constantly providing wealth and prosperity to Her devotees. Her front right hand in the abhaya mudra (assurance gesture) is shown bestowing blessings upon the devotees.

About Hanuman

Lord Hanuman, popularly worshipped as the Hindu God of valour, strength and bravery is easily recognized for his muscular body and long monkey-like tail. Born as the son of the Hindu god of Wind, Vayu, Hanuman is the ultimate flying superhero of Hindu mythology.

He is most famously known as the monkey (vanar) god for his lead role in rescuing Lord Rama’s wife Sita from the clutches of the demon king Ravana of Lanka, in the popular Indian epic, Ramayana. His legend personifies an ideal being, who is humble yet brave. Hanuman's physical prowess, ardent devotion and spiritual purity have made him extremely popular all over India. His devotees invoke his blessings when in need of protection against all worldly evil. He is also fervently worshipped by all bodybuilders, wrestlers and strength trainers who seek his blessings to build a strong body like his, which is only achieved through a combination of dedicated hard work, perseverance and devotion that is synonymous with Hanuman.

About Shankar

Shiva or Shankar, is the third god in the famous Hindu triumvirate along with Brahma, the creator and Vishnu, the preserver. Shiva plays a very significant role as the destroyer and is attributed with bringing change in the world so that the cycle of life can continue and re-creation can take place.

Hindus believe his powers of destruction and re-creation help destroy the illusions and imperfections of this world, paving the way for beneficial change. This destruction, it is said, is not arbitrary, but constructive. Shiva is therefore seen as the source of both good and evil and is regarded as the one who combines many contradictory elements.

Even though Shiva is the destroyer, he is usually represented as peaceful and tranquil with a with a serene smile.

Hindus who worship Shiva as their primary god are members of the Shaivism sect.

Shiva's consort is Devi, the Mother-goddess, who has many forms, including Kali, the goddess of death, and Sati, the goddess of marital felicity. But her best known incarnation is Parvati, Shiva's eternal wife. It is Shiva's relationship with his wife, Parvati which brings him balance. Their union allows him to be an ascetic and a lover, but within the bounds of marriage.

Shiva and Parvati are held up as the perfect example of marital bliss by many Hindus, and one is rarely depicted without the other.

Hindus believe Shiva and Parvati live in the Kailash mountains in the Himalayas and have two children, Ganesha, the famous Hindu elephant-head God and Karthikeya.

The following are some of the many salient features that are symbolic of his representation in Hindu iconography:

  • Blue face and throat. Sometimes his entire body is also shown blue.
  • A third eye - Place in the center of his forehead represents his wisdom and insight. It is also believed to be the source of his untamed energy. A crescent moon on his head.
  • The river Ganga flows out of his hair.
  • Serpents coiled around his body, which not only signifies Shiva's power over the most dangerous creatures in the world but also is symbolic of his power of destruction and recreation.
  • The vibhuti are three lines drawn horizontally across the forehead in white ash. They represent Shiva's all-pervading nature, his superhuman power and wealth. Also, they cover up his powerful third eye. Members of Shaivism often draw vibhuti lines across their forehead.
  • The trident - The three-pronged trident represents the three functions of the Hindu triumvirate. While other gods are depicted in lavish surroundings, Shiva is dressed in simple animal skin and in austere settings, usually in a yogic position. Parvati, whenever she is present, is always at the side of Shiva. Their relationship is one of equality.
  • Tiger skin - He is shown seated upon on a tiger skin
  • Another popular iconography of Shiva is the Natraj or dancing form. Dance is a very important art form in India, and Shiva is believed to be the master of it. The rhythm of dance is a metaphor for the balance in the universe which Shiva is believed to hold so masterfully.His most important dance is the Tandav. This is the cosmic dance of death, which he performs at the end of an age, to destroy the universe.

About Tirthankara

In Jainism, a Tirthankara, also called Jina (“Victor”), is referred to as the saviour who has succeeded in crossing over life’s stream of rebirths and has created a path for others to follow. A Tirthankara provides a bridge for others to follow, away from mortal trappings and worldly pleasures of samsara to the liberation of moksha.

While tirthankaras are documented and revered by Jains, their grace is said to be available to all living beings, regardless of religious orientation.There are said to be 24 present Tirthankaras that are worshipped by Jains today, with Lord Mahavir being the last and most popular.

A tirthankara is mostly represented seated in the lotus position or Padmasana, with their legs crossed in front, the toes of one foot resting close upon the knee of the other, and the right hand lying over the left in the lap. Tirthankar idols looks similar and are differentiated on the basis of symbol or emblem (Lanchhan) belonging to each tirthankar except Parshvanatha, whose statues have a distinct snake cluster above the head. The symbols are marked in centre of the pedestal at the base of the statue.

Both sects of Jainism Digambara and Svetambara have different depiction of idols. Digambara images are naked without any beautification whereas Svetambara ones are clothed and decorated with temporary ornaments. The images are often marked with Srivatsa on the chest and Tilak on forehead. Srivatsa is one of the ashtamangala (auspicious symbol). It looks somewhat like a diamond-shaped symbol.

Jains pay them homage as representatives of great beings in the hope that they may be filled with a sense of renunciation and the highest virtues and thus encouraged along the path toward their final liberation.

About Shiva

Shiva or Shankar, is the third god in the famous Hindu triumvirate along with Brahma, the creator and Vishnu, the preserver. Shiva plays a very significant role as the destroyer and is attributed with bringing change in the world so that the cycle of life can continue and re-creation can take place.

Hindus believe his powers of destruction and re-creation help destroy the illusions and imperfections of this world, paving the way for beneficial change. This destruction, it is said, is not arbitrary, but constructive. Shiva is therefore seen as the source of both good and evil and is regarded as the one who combines many contradictory elements.

Even though Shiva is the destroyer, he is usually represented as peaceful and tranquil with a with a serene smile.

Hindus who worship Shiva as their primary god are members of the Shaivism sect.

Shiva's consort is Devi, the Mother-goddess, who has many forms, including Kali, the goddess of death, and Sati, the goddess of marital felicity. But her best known incarnation is Parvati, Shiva's eternal wife. It is Shiva's relationship with his wife, Parvati which brings him balance. Their union allows him to be an ascetic and a lover, but within the bounds of marriage.

Shiva and Parvati are held up as the perfect example of marital bliss by many Hindus, and one is rarely depicted without the other.

Hindus believe Shiva and Parvati live in the Kailash mountains in the Himalayas and have two children, Ganesha, the famous Hindu elephant-head God and Karthikeya.

The following are some of the many salient features that are symbolic of his representation in Hindu iconography:

  • Blue face and throat. Sometimes his entire body is also shown blue.
  • A third eye - Place in the center of his forehead represents his wisdom and insight. It is also believed to be the source of his untamed energy. A crescent moon on his head.
  • The river Ganga flows out of his hair.
  • Serpents coiled around his body, which not only signifies Shiva's power over the most dangerous creatures in the world but also is symbolic of his power of destruction and recreation.
  • The vibhuti are three lines drawn horizontally across the forehead in white ash. They represent Shiva's all-pervading nature, his superhuman power and wealth. Also, they cover up his powerful third eye. Members of Shaivism often draw vibhuti lines across their forehead.
  • The trident - The three-pronged trident represents the three functions of the Hindu triumvirate. While other gods are depicted in lavish surroundings, Shiva is dressed in simple animal skin and in austere settings, usually in a yogic position. Parvati, whenever she is present, is always at the side of Shiva. Their relationship is one of equality.
  • Tiger skin - He is shown seated upon on a tiger skin
  • Another popular iconography of Shiva is the Natraj or dancing form. Dance is a very important art form in India, and Shiva is believed to be the master of it. The rhythm of dance is a metaphor for the balance in the universe which Shiva is believed to hold so masterfully.His most important dance is the Tandav. This is the cosmic dance of death, which he performs at the end of an age, to destroy the universe.

About Parshvanatha

Parshvanath, also known as Parasnath, is the 23rd of the 24 Tirthankaras in Jainism from this cosmic period.

Parshvanatha, is said to be born on the tenth day of the dark half of the month of Paush to King Ashvasen and Queen Vamadevi in Varanasi, India, about 250 years prior to the birth of Mahavir.

He is believed to have renounced worldly life at the age of 30 and is credited with starting the tradition of "four-fold restraint" – don't kill, don't steal, don't lie and don't own property.

After preaching for 70 years, He attained moksha at the age of 100 atop Sammet Shikhar, now a famous pilgrimage in the mountainous area which is also known as the Parasnath Hills in northern Jharkhand, India.

His symbol or lanchan is the serpent and he is represented with a cluster of hooded snakes above his head, which makes him the most recognizable of 24 Jain Tirthankaras because of this distinct iconography.

About Saraswati

Goddess Saraswati, is revered and worshipped as the Hindu goddess of knowledge, wisdom and learning, and is known for her prowess in art and music.

The goddess Saraswati, seated on a white lotus, is depicted as a beautiful woman dressed in pure white, which symbolizes light, knowledge and truth. Her iconography is typically in white themes from dress to flowers to swan – the colour symbolizing purity, discrimination for true knowledge, insight and wisdom.

She is generally depicted with four arms with each hand holding items that have a symbolic meaning. In one hand is a book, the ancient Vedas, which represents the universal, divine, eternal, and true knowledge as well as all forms of learning. The other hand holds a mala or beaded necklace, representing the power of meditation, inner reflection and spirituality. And the other two hands depict her playing a musical instrument called the Veena, which represents all creative arts and sciences, and symbolizes expressing knowledge that creates harmony. Saraswati is also associated with the love for and rhythm of music, which represents all emotions and feelings expressed in speech or music.

A swan is often located next to her feet, which is also her cosmic vehicle. In Hindu mythology, the Swan is considered a sacred bird, which if offered a mixture of milk and water, is said to be able to drink the milk alone. It thus symbolizes the ability to discriminate between good and evil, essence from outward show and the eternal from the evanescent. The swan is also a symbolism for spiritual perfection, transcendence and moksha.

One of the most famous festivals associated with Goddess Saraswati is the Hindu festival of Vasant Panchami. Celebrated on the 5th day in the Hindu calendar month of Magha, it is also known as Saraswati Puja and Saraswati Jayanti in India. Students and musicians pray and make offerings to Maa Saraswati on this day.

About Krishna

Celebrated for his spirit of compassion, empathy and love, Shri Krishna in his myriad forms is another very popular deity in Hinduism, who is worshipped as the eighth incarnation of Lord Vishnu - the archetype creator of the Universe of the holy Hindu trinity fame. Devotees of Krishna celebrate his birthday with big fanfare on the occasion of Janmashtami.

Such is Krishna’s popularity among the Hindus that he is depicted in several forms that vastly differ from region to region. Some similarities of features, however, transcend across all the forms such as his dark or blue skin complexion, akin to Lord Vishnu, as well as his peacock-feathered wreath or crown and bansuri or flute.

Krishna is often represented as the divine herdsman, Govinda. In this form, he is usually shown playing the flute standing with one leg bent in front of the other in the Tribhanga posture. He is sometimes accompanied by cows or a calf. Alternatively, he is shown as a romantic lover charming the gopis (milkmaids) with his enchanting music.

He is also worshipped as a nurturing child form.

Product Care

The exquisite value of every Aakaar Idol makes it essential to treat it with care and compassion. Propercare ensures that the beauty of the sculpture, which is a permanent heirloom in your home, will be preserved for decades.

  • A soft-bristled brush, such as the one provided with your marble idol should be used for daily cleaning. It will remove the dust easily, without rubbing off the paint.
  • Occasionally, spray clear water, and then leave it to dry or dab it using a soft tissue. Avoid cleaning it with a rough cloth or towel, as it causes friction, which eventually affects the finely painted features of the idol.
  • Puja ingredients like milk, honey, kumkum or vermillion, turmeric, sandalwood paste, saffron, flowers, lemon, ghee, or yogurt etc. tend to stain the marble, hence they should be used with great discretion.
  • The idol should be kept at a distance from incense sticks, diyas, agarbati and dhoop.
  • To keep the delicate facial features of the idol intact, puja or tilak can be done on the feet or a separate charan paduka can be used for the same.

Aakaar Idols are completely handcrafted, using complex procedures of sculpture, polishing and painting. Slight marks and variations in the marble should not be mistaken as a glitch; as any irregularities only add to the inherent uniqueness that is intrinsic to the marble.

Contact us in case the idol or its painting is affected for some reason instead of attempting to fix it yourself. An amateur restoration is more likely to cause permanent damage to it.

We hope you cherish your idol as much as we have taken pride in making it.

For further queries:
Write to us at customercare@aakaar.com or call us at (+91) 961.992.9262 or (+1) 646.847.8479

Why Aakaar?

Bring home an exquisitely hand-crafted wooden pooja temple from AAKAAR IDOLS & TEMPLES. Since 1979, the brand Aakaar is devoted to intricate craftsmanship and has come to be synonymous with trust & quality. For almost four decades our wooden temples have been adorning the homes of our clients around the world, who have rated us as the best in the industry. These several thousand satisfied customers are a strong testament to our quality and design.

When our diverse clientele orders a pooja temple, a ghar mandir, a mandapam, or a devghar, we appreciate them for knowing that they are just not bringing home a piece of furniture to their house. Our devout patrons realize they are choosing a special home for their deity and understand that a wooden temple is not just a product, but an extension of their faith. It’s an integral part of their family because not only is it sacred and holds their prayers but also because it is an heirloom, which must be treasured and passed down through generations.

Our vaastu compliant mandir designs are inspired by our rich Indian heritage and traditions and strike a perfect balance between form and functionality. Whether you’re looking for a temple with doors or without doors, or are looking to hang it on the wall or place it on the floor, with over 50 different models in various sizes, we have all those options and more in the finest finishing you’ll ever see.

We encourage and invite you to choose an exquisite Aakaar home temple and join our family of thousands of other satisfied customers who’s patronage has brought us this far and enabled us to reach you all on Aakaar.com

x

This statue weighs too much to be shipped using UPS or any of our international carriers and will have to be shipped by a freight carrier. We will get you a freight shipping quote for this statue.

During the checkout process freight shipping will not be automatically added to the price. Shipping will be calculated based on the weight of the sculpture and the distance from Oceanside, CA to determine the shipping price. Shipping will then be added to the total after the order is placed and we will email you a new receipt.

This statue weighs too much to be shipped using UPS or any of our international carriers and will have to be shipped by a freight carrier. We will get you a freight shipping quote for this statue. During the checkout process freight shipping will not be automatically added to the price. Shipping will be calculated based on the weight of the sculpture and the distance from Oceanside, CA to determine the shipping price. Shipping will then be added to the total after the order is placed and we will email you a new receipt. We get quotes manually so you, the customer, get the best and lowest priced freight quote possible when we quote the shipment to our 10 freight carriers we have relationships with.

Please call (+91) 981.928.9629 (India) or (+1) 646.847.8479 (USA) or email us customercare@aakaar.com with any questions about shipping or anything else.